Condo, Townhome, Patio Home... What’s the Difference?

Condo

In a condo each owner owns from the walls in plus a fractional share of the common areas.  The biggest difference is there is no land ownership associated with condos.  A condo can be a single story unit. It's the type of ownership that determines condo vs townhome. The Homeowner’s Association (HOA) maintains the exterior of the units (roofs, exterior walls, fences, landscaping) along with the common areas (pools playgrounds, rec centers.) Each owner contributes fees to cover HOA management and maintenance. In some cases, water, gas, cable, trash, and blanket insurance is included in the HOA fees. 

Homeowners insurance coverage is different because the HOA is responsible for covering the exterior (walls out) land, and all common areas. Mechanicals such as air conditioners or hot water heaters that may be located outside are usually the responsibility of the homeowner.

Townhomes

Townhomes ownership includes the land (and airspace) for each unit (and in some cases a yard or patio area) plus a share in the common areas. The units can be single or multistory and usually have one or more common walls to neighboring units. While the HOA is responsible for common areas, it may or may not be responsible for roof, wall, yard and fence maintenance. An important consideration when comparing options.

Patio Home

Patio homes are similar to townhomes but are often free standing . Usually there are no common walls between homes but sometimes there is a common wall or they are connected in a limited fashion.  Ownership is the land and yard and like condos and townhomes, owners have share in all the common areas.  Maintenance of the home and yard is usually the homeowner’s responsibility. In some case however, things like front yard maintenance, water, sewer, trash, cable can also be included.

 

HOA Financials…Is There a Rule of Thumb for Reserves?

An important aspect of the due diligence before purchasing is the financial health of the HOA.  FHA lending policy has set the minimum at 10% of annual common fees as a Reserve Fund contribution. If reserve funds are below 10%, additional guidelines are triggered, such as a higher down payment to offset the higher risk.  10% is easy to measure, but it does not tell the whole story, nor does it predict future needs. 

A community that offers few or no amenities, will still need money for roofs, sidewalks, decks, and paint or siding maintenance. Depending on the amount of money needed, a 10% Reserve Fund contribution may be insufficient for the true needs of the association. That number could be closer to 25% or more! Add in amenities like pools, clubhouses, tennis courts and such and that number climbs higher. A condo reserve study, prepared by a reserve study professional estimates the useful life, replacement schedule and replacement cost of building components.  At the very least compare the reserve study recommendation to the current reserve levels.

Higher Reserve Fund contributions mean higher common fees. Higher common fees can cause potential buyers to go elsewhere so it is not uncommon for associations to keep their fees artificially low so that there is more demand for their unsold units. 

As each community is different, there is no “rule of thumb.” Just as condition and proper maintenance on a single family is impact market value, current and future health of the HOA can have a significant impact on future market value of condos, townhomes, and patio homes.

Beth Rebenstorf

480-236-8760 mobile

480-820-6988 office

 

Future Home Values: Where Do The Experts Think They Are Headed?

Future Home Values: Where Do The Experts Think They Are Headed? | Keeping Current Matters

Today, many real estate conversations center on housing prices and where they may be headed. That is why we like the Home Price Expectation Survey.

Every quarter, Pulsenomics surveys a nationwide panel of over one hundred economists, real estate experts and investment & market strategists about where they believe prices are headed over the next five years. They then average the projections of all 100+ experts into a single number.

The results of their latest survey:

Home values will appreciate by 3.7% over the course of 2016, 3.3% in 2017 and 3.2% in the next two years, and finally 3.1% in 2020 (as shown below). That means the average annual appreciation will be 3.3% over the next 5 years.
Future Home Values: Where Do The Experts Think They Are Headed? | Keeping Current Matters

The prediction for cumulative appreciation slowed slightly from 21.6% to 17.7% by 2020. The experts making up the most bearish quartile of the survey still are projecting a cumulative appreciation of 10.9%.

Future Home Values: Where Do The Experts Think They Are Headed? | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line


Individual opinions make headlines. We believe the survey is a fairer depiction of future values.

Homeowner’s Net Worth is 45x Greater Than a Renter’s

Homeowner’s Net Worth is 45x Greater Than a Renter's | Keeping Current Matters

Every three years the Federal Reserve conducts a Survey of Consumer Finances in which they collect data across all economic and social groups. The latest survey, which includes data from 2010-2013, reports that a homeowner’s net worth is 36 times greater than that of a renter ($194,500 vs. $5,400).

In a Forbes article the National Association of Realtors’ (NAR) Chief Economist Lawrence Yun predicts that in 2016 the net worth gap will widen even further to 45 times greater.

The graph below demonstrates the results of the last two Federal Reserve studies and Yun’s prediction:

Homeowner’s Net Worth is 45x Greater Than a Renter's | Keeping Current Matters

Put Your Housing Cost to Work For You

Simply put, homeownership is a form of ‘forced savings’. Every time you pay your mortgage you are contributing to your net worthEvery time you pay your rent, you are contributing to your landlord’s net worth.

The latest National Housing Pulse Survey from NAR reveals that 85% of consumers believe that purchasing a home is a good financial decision. Yun comments:

“Though there will always be discussion about whether to buy or rent, or whether the stock market offers a bigger return than real estate, the reality is that homeowners steadily build wealth. The simplest math shouldn’t be overlooked.”

Bottom Line


If you are interested in finding out if you could put your housing cost to work for you by purchasing a home, meet with a Rebe Homes real estate professional who can guide you through the process.
(480) 820-6988

Harvard: Why Owning A Home Makes Sense Financially

Harvard: Why Owning A Home Makes Sense Financially | Keeping Current Matters

We have reported many times that the American Dream of homeownership is alive and well. The personal reasons to own differ for each buyer, with many basic similarities.

Eric Belsky, the Managing Director of the Joint Center of Housing Studies at Harvard University expanded on the top 5 financial benefits of homeownership in his paper -The Dream 
Lives On: the Future of Homeownership in America.

Here are the five reasons, each followed by an excerpt from the study: 

1.) Housing is typically the one leveraged investment available.

“Few households are interested in borrowing money to buy stocks and bonds and few lenders are willing to lend them the money. As a result, homeownership allows households to amplify any appreciation on the value of their homes by a leverage factor. Even a hefty 20 percent down payment results in a leverage factor of five so that every percentage point rise in the value of the home is a 5 percent return on their equity. With many buyers putting 10 percent or less down, their leverage factor is 10 or more.”

2.) You're paying for housing whether you own or rent.

“Homeowners pay debt service to pay down their own principal while households that rent pay down the principal of a landlord.” 

3.) Owning is usually a form of “forced savings”.

“Since many people have trouble saving and have to make a housing payment one way or the other, owning a home can overcome people’s tendency to defer savings to another day.”

4.) There are substantial tax benefits to owning.

“Homeowners are able to deduct mortgage interest and property taxes from income...On top of all this, capital gains up to $250,000 are excluded from income for single filers and up to $500,000 for married couples if they sell their homes for a gain.”

5.) Owning is a hedge against inflation.

“Housing costs and rents have tended over most time periods to go up at or higher than the rate of inflation, making owning an attractive proposition.”

Bottom Line


We realize that homeownership makes sense for many Americans for an assortment of social and family reasons. It also makes sense financially. If you are considering a purchase this year, contact a local professional who can help evaluate your ability to do so.

Should I Buy Now Or Wait Until Next Year?

Should I Buy Now Or Wait Until Next Year? [INFOGRAPHIC] | Keeping Current Matters

  • The Cost of Waiting to Buy is defined as the additional funds it would take to buy a home if prices & interest rates were to increase over a period of time.
  • Freddie Mac predicts interest rates to rise to 4.8% by next year.
  • CoreLogic predicts home prices to appreciate by 5.3% over the next 12 months.
  • If you are ready and willing to buy your dream home, find out if you are able to!

Should You Treat Your New Year’s Resolution Like a Game?



Should You Treat Your New Year’s Resolution Like a Game? 

I’ve heard it said, when you're shooting basketball free throws during practice, you shoot with skill. When you're shooting free throws during a game, you think about your aim. And when you're shooting free throws in overtime, you're a nervous wreck. Your skill is the same in all three cases - but because one goal means more to you than another, you let outside considerations weigh on your mind. A person who looks too hard at the outside gets clumsy on the inside.

To make sure you achieve your New Year’s resolution gracefully, ask yourself these four questions:

1. Am I focused on what I want? 

Your goal must be something you want for yourself. Are you defining your goal as something you want or something you are trying to avoid? You’re more likely to experience happiness by adding pleasure into your life instead of simply omitting pain.

2. Do I need help to achieve my goal or can I do it all by myself? 

If your resolution requires help from even one other person your goal can become limited by the energy or motivation of another person involved. Keep 100 percent control of your goal and only YOU decide when you’ll achieve it.

3. Is this something I must do now?

Experience shows if your goal can wait, it will. Explore the conditions necessary to move yourself into action and stay there. Imagine what will happen to the people you care about if you don’t follow through now.

4. Is it going to be worth it? 

It’s great if your goal can be fun like a game. Often times things worth doing aren’t fun or easy at first, but things that are worth it feel like they were easier when you’re done.

Achieving big goals that are worth it is like playing on a basketball team, you win or lose together and some of the most important moments are decided when you are at the free-throw line. 

Allen and Beth Rebenstorf
Rebe Homes Team!
480-236-8760
602-418-4202


Don’t Let Rising Rents Trap You!

Don't Let Rising Rents Trap You! | Keeping Current Matters

There are many benefits to homeownership. One of the top ones is being able to protect yourself from rising rents and lock in your housing cost for the life of your mortgage.

Don’t Become Trapped

Jonathan Smoke, Chief Economist at realtor.com recently reported on what he calls a “Rental Affordability Crisis”. He warns that,

“Low rental vacancies and a lack of new rental construction are pushing up rents, and we expect that they’ll outpace home price appreciation in the year ahead.”

The Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University recently released their 2015 Report on Rental Housing, in which they reported that 49% of rental households are cost-burdened, meaning they spend more than 30% of their income on housing. These households struggle to save for a rainy day and pay other bills, such as food and healthcare.

It’s Cheaper to Buy Than Rent

In Smoke’s article, he went on to say,

“Housing is central to the health and well-being of our country and our local communities. In addition, this (rental affordability) crisis threatens the future value of owned housing, as the burdensome level of rents will trap more aspiring owners into a vicious financial cycle in which they cannot save and build a solid credit record to eventually buy a home.”

 “While more than 85% of markets have burdensome rents today, it’s perplexing that in more than 75% of the counties across the country, it is actually cheaper to buy than rent a home. So why aren’t those unhappy renters choosing to buy?”

Know Your Options

Perhaps, you have already saved enough to buy your first home. HousingWire reportedthat analysts at Nomura believe:

“It’s not that Millennials and other potential homebuyers aren’t qualified in terms of their credit scores or in how much they have saved for their down payment.

It’s that they think they’re not qualified or they think that they don’t have a big enough down payment.” (emphasis added)

Many first-time homebuyers who believe that they need a large down payment may be holding themselves back from their dream home. As we reported last week, in many areas of the country, a first-time home buyer can save for a 3% down payment in less than two years. You may have already saved enough!

Bottom Line


Don’t get caught in the trap so many renters are currently in. If you are ready and willing to buy a home, find out if you are able. Have a professional help you determine if you are eligible to get a mortgage.

Building Family Wealth Over The Next 5 Years

Building Family Wealth Over The Next 5 Years | Keeping Current Matters

As the economy continues to improve, more and more Americans are seeing their personal financial situations also improving. Instead of just getting by, many are now beginning to save and find other ways to build their net worth. One way to dramatically increase their family wealth is through the acquisition of real estate.

For example, let’s assume a young couple purchases and closes on a $250,000 home in January. What will that home be worth five years down the road?

Pulsenomics surveys a nationwide panel of over one hundred economists, real estate experts and investment & market strategists every quarter. They ask them to project how residential prices will appreciate over the next five years. According to their latest survey, here is how much value that $250,000 house will gain in the coming years.

Family Wealth Earned with Home Equity | Keeping Current Matters

Over a five year period, that homeowner can build their home equity to over $40,000. And, in many cases, home equity is large portion of a family’s overall net worth.

Bottom Line


If you are looking to better your family’s long-term financial situation, buying your dream home might be a great option.

Home Prices: Where Are They Headed Over The Next 5 Years?

Home Prices: Where Are They Headed Over The Next 5 Years? | Keeping Current Matters

Today, many real estate conversations center on housing prices and where they may be headed. That is why we like the Home Price Expectation Survey.

Every quarter, Pulsenomics surveys a nationwide panel of over one hundred economists, real estate experts and investment & market strategists about where they believe prices are headed over the next five years. They then average the projections of all 100+ experts into a single number.

The results of their latest survey:

Home values will appreciate by 3.9% by the end of 2015, 3.4% in 2016 and 3.1% in each of the following four years (as shown below). That means the average annual appreciation will be 3.2% over the next 5 years.

Projected Mean Appreciation | Keeping Current Matters

The prediction for cumulative appreciation rose from 18.1% to 21.6% by 2020. Even the experts making up the most bearish quartile of the survey still are projecting a cumulative appreciation of 13.8%.

Cumulative House Appreciation | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line


Individual opinions make headlines. We believe the survey is a fairer depiction of future values.

FSBO, List Again or OTM? A Seller’s Dilemma

FSBO, List Again or OTM? A Seller's Dilemma | Keeping Current Matters

At the end of December, in every region of the country, hundreds of homeowners have a tough decision to make. The ‘listing for sale agreement’ on their house is about to expire and they now must decide to either take their house off the market (OTM), For Sale by Owner (FSBO) or list it again with the same agent or a different agent.

Let’s assume you or someone you know is in this situation and take a closer look at each possibility:
Taking Your Home off the Market

In all probability, after putting your house on the market and seeing it not sell, you’re going to be upset. You may be thinking that no one in the marketplace thought the house was worthy of the sales price.

Because you are upset, you may start to rationalize that selling wasn’t that important after all and say,
“Well, we didn’t really want to sell the house anyway. This idea of making a move right now probably doesn’t make sense.”

Don’t rationalize your dreams away. Instead, consider the reasons you decided to sell in the first place. Ask your family this simple question:

“What made us originally put our home up for sale?” 

If that reason made sense a few months ago when you originally listed the house, chances are it still makes sense now. Don’t give up on what your family hoped to accomplish or on goals your family hoped to attain.

Just because the house didn’t sell during the last listing contract doesn’t mean the house will never sell or that it shouldn’t be sold.

Re-Listing with your Existing Agent

For whatever reason, your house did not sell. Perhaps you now realize how difficult selling a house may be or that the listing price was too high, or perhaps you’re now acknowledging that you didn’t exactly listen to your agent’s advice.

If that is the case, you may want to give your existing agent a second chance. That’s a perfectly okay thing to do.

However, if your agent didn’t perform to the standard they promised when they listed your home you may want to either FSBO or try a different agent.

For Sale by Owner

You may now believe that listing your house with an agent is useless because your original agent didn’t accomplish the goal of selling the house. Trying to sell the house on your own this time may be alluring. You may think you will be in control and save on the commission.

But, is that true? Will you be able to negotiate each of the elements that make up a real estate transaction? Are you capable of putting together a comprehensive marketing plan? Do people who FSBO actually ‘net’ more money?

If you are thinking about FSBOing, take the time to first read: 5 Reasons You Shouldn’t For Sale by Owner.

List with a New Agent

After failing to sell your home, you may no longer trust your agent or what they say. However, don’t paint all real estate professionals with that same brush. Have you ever gotten a bad haircut before? Of course! Did you stop getting your hair cut or did you simply change hair stylists?

There is good and bad in every profession—good and bad hair stylists, agents, teachers, lawyers, doctors, police officers, etc. And just because there are good and bad in every line of work doesn’t mean you don’t call on others for the products and services you need. You still get your haircut, see a doctor, talk to a lawyer, send your kids to school, etc.

Bottom Line


You initially believed that using an agent made sense. It probably still does. Contact a local real estate professional and discuss the possibilities.

How Long Does It Take To Save A Down Payment?

How Long Does It Take To Save A Down Payment? | Keeping Current Matters

In a recent study conducted by Builder.com, researchers determined that nationwide it would take “nearly eight years” for a first-time buyer to save enough for a down payment on their dream home.

Depending on where you live, median rents, incomes and home prices all vary. By determining the percentage a renter spends on housing in each state and the amount needed for a 10% down payment, they were able to establish how long (in years) it would take for an average resident to save.

According to the study, residents in South Dakota are able to save for a down payment the quickest in just under 3.5 years. Below is a map created using the data for each state:

Years Needed to Save 10% Down | Keeping Current Matters

What if you only needed to save 3%?

What if you were able to take advantage of one of the Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae 3% down programs? Suddenly saving for a down payment no longer takes 5 or 10 years, but becomes attainable in under two years in many states as shown in the map below.

Years Needed to Save 3% Down | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line


Whether you have just started to save for a down payment, or have been for years, you may be closer to your dream home than you think! Meet with a local Rebe Homes professional who can help you evaluate your ability to buy today.

Buying A Home? Do You Know The Difference Between Cost & Price?

Buying A Home? Do You Know The Difference Between Cost & Price? | Keeping Current Matters

As a seller, you will be most concerned about ‘short term price’ – where home values are headed over the next six months. As a buyer, you must be concerned not about price but instead about the ‘long term cost’ of the home.

The Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA), the National Association of Realtors, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac all projected that mortgage interest rates will increase by about three-quarters of a percentage point over the next twelve months.

According to CoreLogic’s most recent Home Price Index Report, home prices will appreciate by 5.2% over the next 12 months.

What Does This Mean as a Buyer?


Here is a simple demonstration of what impact an interest rate increase would have on the mortgage payment of a home selling for approximately $250,000 today if home prices appreciate by the 5.2% predicted by CoreLogic over the next twelve months:

Cost of Waiting | Keeping Current Matters

Why You Will Need to Sell Your Home Twice

You Will Need to Sell Your Home Twice | Keeping Current Matters

recent post on “The Home Story”, a site published by Fannie Mae, explained the difference between the price a seller may get for their home and the value an appraiser might assign the property.

The Sales Price

Of course, most sellers want to maximize the value they get for the house. However, the price they set might not be reflective of the other comparable homes in the neighborhood. As the article stated:
“People tend to view their homes emotionally, and that can become quickly apparent when they decide to sell.”

That doesn’t mean that the home won’t necessarily sell for that price.

A seller can set an asking price and actually have a buyer agree to that price. However, that value may not be necessarily in agreement with what most buyers are willing to pay. For example, one person can view a property, determine it is exactly what they are looking for and well worth the asking price, whereas another person could look at the same property and feel the asking price is too high.

Steven Corbin, Director of Valuation in Fannie Mae’s CPM Real Estate division gives an example:
“Someone may have driven by the property countless times, and they really want to live in that house. So in reality they may overbid for that property. This would be a situation where the actions of a specific buyer do not represent the actions of a typical buyer.”

The Appraised Value (or Market Value)

Fannie Mae explains what they look for when appraising the house:

“When a contract is established on a property, an appraised value is determined by a professional real estate appraiser. The appraiser works on the lender’s behalf to determine that value by taking many factors into consideration, including the neighborhood, the value of properties of similar size and construction, and even such things as the type of fixtures on the premises and layout of the floor plan.”

Corbin adds:

“From a lending perspective, a bank would want to know the probable price a typical buyer would offer for the property. That’s what an appraiser would set as the market value.”

The Challenge when Sales Price and Appraisal Value are Different

If the appraiser comes in with a value that is below the agreed upon sales price, the lending institution might not authorize the mortgage for the full amount a buyer would need to complete the transaction.
Quicken Loans actually releases a Home Price Perception Index (HPPI) that quantifies the difference between what sellers and appraisers believe regarding value. The HPPI represents the difference between appraisers’ and homeowners’ opinions of home values.

Currently, there is approximately a 2% difference between what homeowners believe their home to be worth and what appraisers value that same home. On a $300,000 sale that would be a $6,000 difference. That could be a challenge that might prevent the home sale proceeding to the closing table.

Quicken Loans Chief Economist Bob Walters recently commented on this issue:

“The more homeowners are in line with appraisers, the easier it will be to refinance their mortgage and easier for those looking to buy a home. If the two are aligned, it eliminates one of the top stumbling blocks in the mortgage process.”

Bottom Line

Every house on the market has to be sold twice; once to a prospective buyer and then to the bank (through the bank’s appraisal). In a housing market where supply is very low and demand is very high, home values increase rapidly. One major challenge in such a market is the bank appraisal. If prices are jumping, it is difficult for appraisers to find adequate comparable sales (similar houses in the neighborhood that closed recently) to defend the price when performing the appraisal for the bank.


With escalating prices, the second sale might be even more difficult than the first. That is why we suggest that you use an experienced real estate professional to help set your listing price.

Home Prices: Past, Present & Future

Home Prices: Past, Present and Future | Keeping Current Matters

CoreLogic released their most current Home Price Index last week. In the report, they revealed home appreciation in three categories: percentage appreciation over the last year, over the last month and projected over the next twelve months.

Here are state maps for each category:

The Past – home appreciation over the last 12 months

Home Prices Past | Keeping Current Matters

The Present – home appreciation over the last month

Home Prices Present | Keeping Current Matters

The Future – home appreciation projected over the next 12 months

Home Prices Future | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line:

Homes across the country are appreciating at different rates. If you plan on relocating to another state and are waiting for your home to appreciate more, you need to know that the home you will buy in another state may be appreciating even faster.


Meet with a local Rebe Homes professional who can help you determine your next best steps.

What You Really Need To Qualify For A Mortgage

What You Really Need To Qualify For A Mortgage | Keeping Current Matters

A recent survey by Ipsos found that the American public is still somewhat confused about what is actually necessary to qualify for a home mortgage loan in today’s housing market. The study pointed out two major misconceptions that we want to address today.

1. Down Payment

The survey revealed that consumers overestimate the down payment funds needed to qualify for a home loan. According to the report, 36% think a 20% down payment is always required. In actuality, there are many loans written with a down payment of 5% or less.

Below are the results of a Digital Risk survey done on Millennials who recently purchased a home.

Millennials & Down Payments | Keeping Current Matters

2. FICO Scores

The Ipsos survey also reported that two-thirds of the respondents believe they need a very good credit score to buy a home, with 45 percent thinking a “good credit score” is over 780. In actuality, the average FICO scores of approved conventional and FHA mortgages are much lower.

Below are the numbers from the latest Ellie Mae report.

Average FICO Score | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line


If you are a prospective purchaser who is ‘ready’ and ‘willing’ to buy but not sure if you are also ‘able,’ sit down with someone who can help you understand your true options.

Prices & Mortgage Rates Going Up in 2016

Prices and Mortgage Rates Going Up in 2016 | Keeping Current Matters

The monthly mortgage payment on a home is determined by two elements: the price of the house and the interest rate you pay on your mortgage. Recently released reports are revealing that the experts expect both elements to increase in 2016.

HOME PRICES

CoreLogic has projected a nationwide 5.2% home value appreciation for the next twelve months. 
Here is their breakdown by state:

Pricing Forecast | Keeping Current Matters

MORTGAGE INTEREST RATES

All four of the entities that provide projections on mortgage interest rates agree: they’re going up in 2016. Here are the predictions over the next four quarters:

Interest Rates | Keeping Current Matters

Bottom Line


With both home values and interest rates projected to increase over the next twelve months, buying (or moving-up), sooner rather than later, makes sense.

The Residential Rental Market Heading into 2016

The Residential Rental Market Heading into 2016 | Keeping Current Matters

Below are quotes from experts as well as industry reports & articles that cover the residential rental market in the U.S.

The experts…


"Make no mistake: Despite this recent slowdown in rental appreciation, the rental affordability crisis we've been enduring for the past few years shows no signs of easing, especially as income growth remains weak. It will take a lot more supply, and a lot more renters-turned-homeowners, to fully reverse this.”


“Rents and home prices are expected to exceed income growth into next year because of the insufficient creation of new home construction and the detrimental impact its inadequacy continues to have on housing costs in several markets.”


"We know rents are rising faster than incomes, and now we have data to show that many renters don't have enough to pay all their debts each month, which is forcing them to make tradeoffs, such as cutting spending on other items.”

The reports and articles…


“Rising rents won't let up in 2016, and will continue to set new records. The next year will bring the least affordable median rents ever.”


“68% of property managers predict that rental rates will continue to rise in the next year by an average of 8%”


“The primary reasons cited for the latest rises were increasing demand and low inventory. Vacancy rates for rental housing nationally dropped to a 20-year low of 6.8 percent in the second quarter…Rents and occupancies are currently hovering at historic highs as supply isn't keeping up with demand.”

 Bottom Line


If you are one of the many renters debating a home purchase, meet with a real estate professional in your area who can show you your options, before your rent goes up!